Vaginal and oral use of probiotics as adjunctive therapy to fluconazole in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis: A clinical trial on Iranian women

Document Type : Original Articles

Authors

1 Department of Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

2 Invasive Fungi Research Center, Communicable Diseases Institute, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran Department of Medical Mycology, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran

3 Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran

4 Obstetrics and Gynecologist, Kashan, Iran

5 Beheshti Hospital, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran

6 Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, Faculty of Medicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran

7 Invasive Fungi Research Center, Communicable Diseases Institute, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran

10.18502/cmm.7.3.7803

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Vulvovaginal candidiasis is considered the second most
prevalent gynecologic infection among women and one of the main reasons for referring to a gynecologist. During recent decades, probiotic usage has been defined as one of the therapeutic regimens for vaginal candidiasis management, but these findings were controversial. The current study was conducted to determine the effect of fluconazole plus vaginal and oral probiotics supplementation on clinical and mycological improvement of vaginal candidiasis concomitant with antifungal susceptibility of Candida species to fluconazole.
Materials and Methods: This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was
conducted on 76 women with vaginal candidiasis admitted to Naghavi and Imam Reza
Gynecology Clinics in Kashan, Central Iran, from July 2017 to March 2020. Patients
were diagnosed according to vaginal candidiasis symptoms and positive culture for
Candida species. The patients were divided into two groups; one of them received
fluconazole plus vaginal and oral probiotics, while the other one received fluconazole
with placebo. The clinical and mycological findings were recorded before and after the
treatment. In vitro, the fluconazole susceptibility test was determined by the
microdilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (M27-A3) for the baseline Candida isolates.
Results: Based on the findings, 35 days after the intervention, a significant reduction
was reported in vaginal candidiasis symptoms in the probiotics supplementation group.
Although probiotics supplementation therapy was a better mycological cure, compared
to the fluconazole with the placebo group, this difference was not significant (68.4% vs.
46.9%, P=0.184). Exclusion of resistant and susceptible dose-dependent strain in the
regression model demonstrated a significant reduction in positive culture probiotics in
the supplementation group.
Conclusion: Oral and vaginal supplementation with probiotics for 4 weeks played a
significant role in the elimination of vaginal candidiasis symptoms. Adjustment of
clinical and mycological responses with drug resistance patterns of patients could open a promising horizon for probiotics consumption as a complementary treatment.
 

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